Sunday, December 18, 2005

Reading vs. Eating

Reading About Food That's Almost Better Than Eating

Burgundy Stars by William Echikson:
The drama of the evolution of La Cote d'Or in the late Bernard Loiseau's quest for the third Michelin Star, interwoven with the history of the Michelin and Gault Millau guides. As satisfyingly indulgent as watching a good soap opera with a carton of Haagen-Dazs.

Garlic and Sapphires by Ruth Reichl:
If you enjoyed her reviews in the New York Times, you will eat up this book. Mouthwatering food descriptions, entertaining restaurant adventures, some easy recipes, and how she came to and ended up leaving the New York Times. (Tender at the Bone and Comfort Me With Apples are much more enjoyable if you read this first.)

The Soul of a Chef by Michael Ruhlman:
An up-close-and-personal look into the dedication, madness, and passion of three chefs-- Brian Polcyn, Michael Symon, and Thomas Keller. Ruhlman is both knowledgeable and entertaining (when he's not repeatedly asserting his CIA background or being too starstruck with the subject matter).

The Emperor of Wine: The Rise of Robert M. Parker, Jr. and the Reign of American Taste by Elin McCoy:
Wine gossip. Pour yourself a glass of wine and enjoy (also check out Mondovino on DVD).

Eating My Words by Mimi Sheraton:
A bit pedantic but still enjoyable. So was it Mimi Sheraton or Ruth Reichl who had a run-in with royalty while dining at Le Cirque? It's good reading either way.

It Must Have Been Something I Ate by Jeffrey Steingarten:
Science, logic, bread baking, being poisoned by inedible garnishes, and taste tests of salt/water/ketchup. The humorous lengths to which Jeffrey Steingarten, The Man Who Ate Everything, will go in search of the best food make for a great read.

A Cook's Tour by Anthony Bourdain:
The behind the scenes of his travels around the world for the series that was on Food Network. Even better than Kitchen Confidential.

Cooking for Mr. Latte by Amanda Hesser:
Chick Lit meets a slightly (very) neurotic Betty Crocker.

Super Chef by Juliette Rossant:
The making of chef empires featuring Wolfgang Puck, Charlie Palmer, Todd English, Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger, and Tom Colicchio.

House Husband by Ad Hudler:
A humorous look into a man's transition from the business world to the domestic world, with a number of easy and quite decent recipes he has created en route.

Death by Pad Thai edited by Douglas Bauer:
Short stories by various authors about their memories associated with food, good and bad, with some truly standout poignant essays.

More Food Reading:

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